Cyber Schools Are All About Technology

Some people are intimidated or unimpressed by cyber schools because they think they are more focused on technology than curriculum. These individuals may not understand how online learning and offline learning can connect for a complete educational experience, or they might just think there is no substance beyond the virtual classrooms and real-time interaction.

No matter what their reasoning, those who doubt the online learning model can benefit from an explanation about the many opportunities and resources offered by cyber schools. This article aims to debunk the common myth that online learning is all about technology and explain the wealth of possibilities these Internet-based schools offer.

In addition to virtual classrooms, real-time student interaction, online tools, and education management systems, today’s online schools offer students:

    • Instruction from certified teachers. These teachers are specially trained in how to work effectively in an online classroom, and they have all kinds of resources at their disposal. They work one-on-one with their students to develop personalized educational plans that meet their unique learning needs.

    • Access to certified curricula. Today’s cyber schools are held accountable by state standards that govern other public schools. They follow the same standardized testing requirements, and they are structured around state-approved curricula.

    • Lots of opportunity to collaborate with teachers and parents. Teacher support and parental involvement are both critical to a student’s success. That’s why these schools create an environment where parents, students and teachers are brought together to collaborate and develop learning approaches that work.

    • The chance to join clubs and activities. Many cyber schools offer extracurricular opportunities that can bring kids together outside of the online classroom. Whether those are academic/art/literary clubs, volunteer opportunities, or community-based activities, students have plenty of opportunities to interact with their peers and form meaningful relationships.

  • An education that exists outside of the computer. Contrary to what some think, cyber school students do not spend all their time in front of a computer. Many lessons require practical application of the material, and students are able to spend plenty of time doing hands-on activities, reading textbooks, using workbooks and utilizing traditional school supplies.